According to Brian Hill, owner/developer of Silo Square in Southaven, the project is coming along.

They’ve got six buildings set to be finished by the end of the year, and he said, “If the phone calls keep coming in the way they’re coming in now, I’m going to say that we’re probably going to have two more town-square buildings starting by the end of the year.”

Silo Square is a $200 million, 228-acre mixed-use development, which will feature buildings with both commercial and residential purposes, hotels, single-family homes, and more.

Barry D. Maynard and Frank Dyer, VPs of brokerage at Gill Properties, are handling commercial leasing, brokerage, and out parcel ground leases and sales at Silo Square.

Hill said he had Oxford Square in mind when he designed Silo Square.

“But do it in today’s era,” he said. “Thinking about pedestrian walkability. [With] old town squares, all of the buildings were connected just one right after another. We’re building our buildings to look as if they were built one right after another. But every hundred feet, we have a pedestrian alleyway or a plaza. So our walkability of the overall development is way, way better.”

They are currently working on a pedestrian bridge, which will connect Silo Square to nearby Snowden Grove park.

“The pedestrian bridge is the missing link between the two [sites],” Hill said. “Now you’ll be able to ride a bike, and even if it’s rush hour traffic, safely cross over Getwell Road.”

One of the latest to buy an out parcel is Tekila, a high-end Mexican restaurant that will serve lunch, dinner, and even breakfast.

Hill said that Tekila is not your ordinary Mexican restaurant. This one is two stories with a wrap-around porch on the second level.

Among the announced Silo Square tenants are Slim Chicken’s, City Hall Cheesecake, Planters Bank & Trust Co., and a dental office.

Hill’s vision for Silo Square includes four to six restaurants, half a dozen boutiques, investment firms, a mortgage company, a law office — and the list goes on.

But the spot isn’t for just anyone. Maynard said that some big-name franchises have been turned away, as not really fitting into the Square’s ethos.

“We don’t just want to be a strip mall,” Maynard said. “It’s not. This is a live, work, play [environment].”

Correction/Clarification
The story original stated that Tekila leased space, when in fact it purchased a parcel.